About us


Dorus Mhor celebrates the artistry of fine textiles through its application to jewellery.

Inspired by a lifelong passion for ornate textiles and with a Fine Art degree in Sculpture, British designer Elizabeth Bloom handcrafts exquisite tactile gems using carefully selected fabrics. These include a medley of monochromatic jewel-toned silks and limited edition prints that tell a unique story. 

 

Fluorite Collection 2018

The 2018 Fluorite collection showcases selected silks by Weston. These prints are created using high definition scans of rock crystals and minerals that “see inside” these small fragments, capturing unique inflections of bold colour and intricate print detail. A typical Weston scarf, with its crystal clear patterns and vibrant colours, shows a section of a mineral less than 1cm in diameter. Printed in world-renowned Como in Italy, the silks bring these images to life.

 

How it all began.

Scottish born designer Elizabeth Bloom grew up in the town famous for weaving the Chanel tweeds. With one grandfather a trained silversmith and the other an expert in weaving, it could be said that it was her destiny to create a unique marriage of metal and textiles. Taught from a young age to sew by her dressmaker mother, Elizabeth later graduated with a Fine Art degree in sculpture.

Along the way she rescued a few bin bags filled with remnants of ornate tweeds from Linton Tweeds. Too beautiful to throw away, but too small to do much with, it wasn’t until she stumbled upon a covered button maker on a crowded Vietnamese pavement while on a six month sabbatical that an idea was born.

Button making progressed onto bead making - and once a technique was developed, fabrics became finer and pieces more delicate.

After launching in London in 2011, Elizabeth spent three years in Chicago before moving to her husband’s home of Cape Town, where she now designs and hand crafts every piece from her home studio.

The name Dorus Mhor (the 'h' is silent) pays tribute to Elizabeth's idyllic childhood home in Scotland . The Gaelic translation literally means "great door".